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Page history last edited by Carol 5 years, 4 months ago

WCS Reading Lists

 

"Kids say that the #1 reason they do not read more is because they can not find books they like to read" according to the Kids and Family Reading Report (2006) conducted by Yankelovich and Scholastic.

 

To help students find great books, our Librarian, Mrs. Carol Satta, in collaboration with the classroom teachers, has posted reading lists for students in Pre-K through 12th grade (see below).

 

Many of the books listed have received one or more books awards. Books awards are noted on the lists, and the awards are briefly described on the sidebar to the right.

 

Typically reading lists consist almost exclusively of fiction titles.  However, nonfiction books are also very popular with students (especially the boys) so we have included some exceptional nonfiction titles, too.  These reading lists are a work in progress, and we hope to include many more great books over time, particularly a greater selection of nonfiction titles.

 

These lists serve only as a guide.  Just as parents need to know what their children are viewing and hearing through other media, parents should be aware of what their children are reading.  Some parents may find these lists too narrow while others will consider them too inclusive.    Any concerns about a particular book included on one of the lists should be addressed using the following form:  Request for Reconsideration of a Book Included on a WCS Reading List.

 

Interest and reading levels vary widely within any age range, so the following lists also range widely to accommodate various reading levels and interests.  Sometimes books which interest young readers have a higher reading level.  In those cases, students may be motivated to read above their reading level and rise to the challenge (and that's okay!), or parents may want to choose one of those books to read aloud at bed time.  

 

For more reading suggestions, check out Further Resources for Suggested Reading Lists.  Want some ideas for encouraging reading in your home?  We've compiled some advice offered by several different reading experts:  Tips for Encouraging Reading.   

 

Reading is fun!  Families can make happy associations with reading by visiting the library regularly, awarding achievements with a shopping trip to the bookstore, discovering books that capture the reader's interest (which might not match a parent's interests), reading a mixture of fiction and nonfiction titles, listening to audiobooks during travel times, or snuggling up with a good book at bedtime.  

 

Mrs. Satta and the teachers have made every effort to compile lists of the "creme de la creme" of both classic and contemporary books from a variety of genres.  Our hope is that when the students "taste and see" how stimulating and enjoyable reading can be, they'll keep coming back for more!  

 

Do you enjoy reading and discussing books?  Check out the Webster Christian School book discussion blog (http://wcslibrary.edublogs.org), a place for members of the Webster Christian School and Webster Bible Church communities to discover and discuss books.

 

Pre-K and Kindergarten Reading List

 

1st and 2nd Grade Reading List

 

3rd and 4th Grade Reading List

 

5th and 6th Grade Reading List

 

7th and 8th Grade Reading List

 

9th and 10th Grade Reading List

 

11th and 12th Grade Reading List

 

 

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